From Farm To Turkey, Here Is The Journey of The Cranberry

 

At Thanksgiving, there are two types of carnivores. Those who love cranberry sauce with their turkey, and those who hate it. No matter which category you fall into, your Thanksgiving dinner table is likely to have a bowl of the gelatinous red stuff at the ready. In many households across America, it comes from a can with a slurp and a gurgle. A cylindrical red mass plops right into the bowl and jiggles as it settles. 

Do you ever find yourself wondering how it got there? Do you know where cranberries come from? What do these little globes of bitterness go through to get from the farm to your Thanksgiving dinner? Stick around. We’re going to answer these questions and more in this post. 

How are cranberries grown?

The first thing any good cranberry grower needs is a big, swampy bog in which to grow his ruby red merchandise. You see, Cranberries are fussy little things. If the farmer doesn’t get conditions just so, they’ll up and die. Here are the very specific conditions cranberries need to grow: 

  • Boggy, marshy wetlands
  • Acid peat soil
  • Sand
  • Gravel
  • Clay
  • Loads and loads of water
  • Water reels (aka Eggbeaters) for wet harvesting
  • A mechanical picker for dry harvesting

The wetlands that cranberries require in order to grow tasty enough to make it to your family Thanksgiving are unique. They have to have layers of acidic peat soil, sand, gravel and clay for the cranberry vines to thrive. This combination needs to be pretty precise for our favorite bitter berry to grow and is often found in the world’s bogs that were left behind long ago by glaciers. 

Do cranberries grow in water? 

Yes and no. There are several points during the life of a cranberry where the field needs to be flooded with water: 

  • Winter flood
  • Late water
  • Harvest flood

The winter flood is used to prevent what is called winterkill. That’s when cranberry vines can be harmed by harsh winter weather. Flooding the vines protects them from these brutal winter conditions and the flood can stay put for most of the winter. Think of it as a nice, cozy duvet for the chilly cranberry vines. 

Late water is all about keeping the frost away from the precious and delicate cranberry vines. With a pool of water on the cranberry field, frost cannot form on the vines and damage them. Late water seconds as a method of preventing known pests from accessing the cranberry vines. This flood can be done shortly after the winter flood has been pumped out in early spring and then again in late fall. 

The harvest flood is only done when you’re collecting your ripe and ready cranberries with the wet method of harvesting. This flood makes harvesting cranberries much easier. The field is flooded with about a foot of water the night before the harvest. On the day of the harvest, water reels (nicknamed eggbeaters) are used to agitate the vines and loosen the berries. When a cranberry is ripe, it has a little air bubble inside which allows it to float. That’s when all the fresh cranberries are collected, the water is pumped from the field and recycled and the fruit is loaded into trucks and shipped off to its next destination. 

Where do cranberries go after harvest? 

Cranberries destined to be molded into the jellied can form are sent off to the cranberry processing plant. Once they arrive, the red berries are cleansed using specialized equipment that is built specifically so as not to bruise or injure the delicate fruits. Here is a selection of our specialized fruit and vegetable handling equipment. The cranberries are then sent on a ride down a shaker so they can be sorted according to their size. Often, cranberries are stored and frozen at this point. Large cranberry processing plants require large freezers, where wooden crates of cranberries can be stacked to the ceiling. When it’s time to make the cranberry sauce, the blocks of frozen cranberries are broken up with large metal spikes and then mixed with fresh cranberries. 

How is canned cranberry sauce made? 

Making cranberry sauce is a simple process. Sometimes the fruit is pureed before cooking, and sometimes the berries just go straight into the hot water where they are boiled in large mixing kettles. That’s when the bitter berries are sweetened and simmered a second time so the fruit transforms into a gooey red slop. The sweetener tends to be corn syrup more often than not and lemon or citric acid can be added as a flavor enhancer and a preservative. The mixture is also often pasteurized to lengthen its life in the can and make it safe for you to serve to your family at Thanksgiving. 

Interestingly, there is no gelatin added to the sauce. Its jellied state is solely a result of the thickening of corn syrup or sugar. 

Once the sauce has reached perfection, it is poured into cans using specialized canning equipment and they are then steamed for sterilization and sealed. Since our sticky red sauce is still quite hot, the cans require cooling and so they head to a chilly water bath. Once they’ve dropped sufficiently in temperature and the cans are dried, they head onto the labeler and find their way into a case that’s headed to your local grocery store. 

It’s not uncommon for these cans of gooey fruit to sell out around Thanksgiving. If you’ve found yourself without can-shaped cranberries, worry not! Making your own homemade cranberry sauce is almost as easy as opening a can! 

How do you make cranberry sauce? 

You will need: 

  • 1 12 oz bag of fresh cranberries 
  • 1 cup of white sugar 
  • 1 cup of orange juice
  • 2 tsp of orange zest (optional) 

To get that delicious sauce on the table, all you have to do is wash your cranberries and throw them in a saucepan with the rest of the ingredients. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer until your berries start popping. Remove from the heat, and the sauce will get thicker as it cools. 

Optional flavor-enhancers can include a little shake of cinnamon (or you can boil your berries with a cinnamon stick), fresh-squeezed lemon juice and lemon zest, a pinch of nutmeg, pecans, blueberries and much more. 

What can I do with leftover cranberry sauce? 

For most families, this makes way too much cranberry sauce, though and you’re going to end up with a tub of it in your fridge for the next week. What can you do with leftover cranberry sauce once dinner is over? Here are some ideas: 

  • Cook it into your favorite muffin recipe. Muffins love cranberries. 
  • Spread it generously on a piece of buttered toast and gobble it alongside your coffee in the morning.
  • Use it as a colorful condiment on a turkey sandwich.
  • Add it to plain yogurt for a cranberry-flavored dairy treat.
  • The kids will love it as a pancake topping in place of the usual syrup.
  • A bagel with cream cheese and cranberry sauce is to-die-for
  • Glaze your meat with it. Whether you’re roasting or grilling, cranberry sauce makes an excellent and flavorful glaze for poultry especially. 

No matter what you use it for, there is clearly no need to toss the jewel-colored sauce in the trash. 

There you have it! The story of the gorgeous cranberry, from the farm to your table, to your bagel with cream cheese. 

October 2019 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of October and what are they looking for when they are here?

Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from BoE search traffic this month.

Bid on Equipment's Top 10 Categories Searched

Restaurant Equipment

Dairy Equipment

Bakery Equipment

Packaging Equipment

Machine Shop Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Air Compressors

Steam Boilers

Walk In Coolers

Powder Coating Equipment


The top ten categories sold for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Conveyors

Food Processing

Mixers

Laboratory

Tanks

Meat Equipment

Mills

Metal Detectors

Shrink Equipment

Bakery Equipment


The top ten manufacturer pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Bridgeport

Mueller

Vemag

Urschel

Sweco

Trane

Multivac

Vulcan

IQF

Butcher Boy


The top ten viewed Items in the last month.

ZSK Embroidery Equipment

Peanut Roaster

Multilith 1250 Press

Henny Penny Pressure Fryer

Cushman 4-Wheel Truckster

Esporta ES3300 Wash System

Nestaflex 175 Flexible Accordion Roller Conveyor

RMI Laser Division LE-100SB Laser Diode System with Controller

Finamac Popsicle Machine with Water Cooler

Powder Coating Oven

What's The Difference Between Pulled Candy & Hard Candy?

Most of us never really grow out of our love for candy. Sure, we tell ourselves we do, but there's a reason candy-making videos have become all the rage in online spaces like YouTube and Facebook. Adults still love the sweet stuff; it's as simple as that. 

Further proof of our confectionery devotion is the fact that the candy industry in the U.S. alone is a whopping $35 billion/year business. You and I both know, we're not giving all those bonbons to our kids. We're sneaking those sweets when no one's looking. 

If you've ever consciously tried to cut down on sugar while raising children, you've noticed that there is always a reason to have candy in the house. Sometimes it's a post-Easter stash calling your name out from the back of a cupboard. Other times you're drawn by the subtle smell of candy corn at the bottom of your kid's trick or treat bag. Maybe, it's just leftover candy canes from Old St. Nick. Heck, even if you don't give your kids candy for these holidays, someone else is bound to do it! Candy is simply everywhere. 

It's no wonder candy rakes in so much dough. 

As you might have guessed, most of those revenue dollars are being made by companies that manufacture candy bars. Chocolate is hands down, the biggest seller. Us North Americans really love the brown stuff. Gum, gummies and sugar-free options also top the revenue charts in the confectionery industry. Hard candy holds its own, though, raking in a cool $591 million per year in the U.S.

The most popular brands of hard candy are Jolly Ranchers and Werther's Original, neither of which are all that surprising. It seems like Werther's occupy every candy dish in the continental U.S. (and always disappear fast).

One of the smallest market shares in the confectionery industry belongs to softer, chewier candy such as taffy. That's not to say Americans still don't love the stuff, buying a whopping $210 million worth of it every year.  

 

What is the difference between hard candy and pulled candy? 

The answers to these questions are simple. 

Hard candy is flavored sugar melted down into a syrup and then allowed to cool. Often the candy is cooled in molds to take a familiar shape. The resulting product is hard, brittle and often shiny, like glass. If you drop it, it's going to smash. 

To make candy of this sort, you need a high concentration of sugar in the syrup. 99% to be exact. It must be boiled to 160 °C (320 °F) to get that classic glass-like brittleness. 

Taffy, on the other hand, starts as a syrup with a lower concentration of sugar, about 95% and it is boiled to a lower temperature than hard candy. Taffy is cooked to a temperature range of around 132 to 143 °C (270 to 289 °F). 

Taffy is often pulled, as well, using a candy hook. When the syrup mixture reaches the necessary temperature, it's poured out on a marble countertop to cool as it is far too hot to handle right out of the kettle. Once it has cooled slightly, the candy maker will sling it over a candy pulling hook, stretch it, fold it back over onto itself and repeat the process. The purpose of this method is to incorporate tiny air bubbles into the sweet mixture, which gives the resulting product an opaque, finished look and can create a chewier, softer end product. 

The final texture, however, will depend on your candy concentration and the temperature the mixture reached in the kettle.

You can, of course, pull your candy concoction by hand with a relatively cheap candy pulling hook that will run you a couple hundred bucks. Or, you can purchase a candy pulling machine for a few thousand dollars and save yourself some time and energy. For larger batches of candy, a machine might be your best bet. 

The newest trend in the candy biz is craft candy. Like craft beer or craft soda, craft candy is made by small, mom n' pop shops popping up across the U.S. that are turning back to old ways and highlighting local ingredients. They're using traditional methods and their own hands to craft some of the tastiest treats around. These are the folks who tend to make the mesmerizing candy-pulling videos that pop up on your Facebook news feed. Videos like this one: 

You'll notice these candy makers are doing everything by hand, adding to the appeal of the finished product. 

In a more industrial, large-batch setting, machines are used to incorporate air into the candy: 

In both videos, you can see that as the candy is pulled, the more opaque the color becomes. 

The difference between hard candy and pulled candy perfectly illustrates how the same ingredients can produce an entirely different experience depending on how they are prepared. It's all just sugar, water, color and flavor. Hard candies are cooked to a higher temperature and have a higher sugar concentration, while chewier candies are cooked to a slightly lower temperature and have a minutely smaller sugar concentration. One will crack when you bite down on it. The other is going to give way to the pressure of your teeth. 

Some people opt for the hard version of their favorite treats over the soft because the softer, chewier bites are notorious for getting stuck in your teeth, ripping out fillings and destroying any orthodontic appliances they might have occupying their mouths. 

Whether you prefer your candy hard or chewy, though, you're going to need to brush your teeth.

So, which sort of candy do you prefer? Are you a hard candy lover or do you prefer a chewier sensation while satisfying your sweet tooth? Me, I am more of a gummy lover than anything, but gummies are a whole other blog post.  

Check out the kind of Candy Equipment available on Bid on Equipment right now!

September 2019 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of September and what are they looking for when they are here?
 

Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from BoE search traffic this month.

Bid on Equipment's Top 10 Categories Searched

Walk In Cooler

Packaging Equipment

Air Compressors

HVAC Equipment

Restaurant Equipment

Dairy Equipment

Bakery Equipment

Refrigeration Equipment

Meat Processing Equipment

Warehouse Equipment


The top ten categories sold for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Conveyors

Fillers

Labelers

Kettles

Candy Equipment

Pumps

Mills

Sifters and Shakers

Shrink Equipment

Tanks


The top ten manufacturer pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Mueller

Trane

Sweco

IQF

Butcher Boy

Bridgeport

Vemag

Urschel

Multivac

Cretors


The top ten viewed Items in the last month.

4000 Gallon Tank with Sweep Agitation - Stainless Steel

Carruthers Advantage Slicer / Dicer

Virto Cuccolini Rectangular Screen - 40in X 84in

1650 Gallon Jacketed, Scrape Agitation Cone Bottle Kettle / Processor

100 Cu. Ft. Rietz Paddle Blender

43 Cu. Ft. Littleford FKM-1200-D Jacketed Plow Mixer

Gold Medal Corn Treat Cooker Mixer Digital Mark 10

Complete Vial Line

Shanklin A26A Automatic L-Bar and T6XL Tunnel

Southbend DCX-2S Convection Steamer

Most Popular Halloween Candy in Every State

When it comes to timing and day of the week, Halloween and trick-or-treating have become a touchpoint in the parenting community. How early is too early for trick-or-treaters? How old is too old? And, of course, the age-old question: Should Halloween be moved to a Saturday?

 

We surveyed 2,004 people in residential neighborhoods across the country to find out. 

According to respondents, ideal trick-or-treating hours are 6 to 9 p.m. and trick-or-treaters age out of the tradition at 15 years old. Staying out past bedtime on a school night doesn’t bother most participants - almost half say that the holiday shouldn’t be moved to the last Saturday in October. 

 Whether you’re celebrating the spooky holiday on a Thursday or a Saturday, we can all agree: The candy haul is the best part of Halloween for trick-or-treaters. Even those without children get in on the fun, with more than 3 out of 4 choosing to stay home and answer the door to hand out candy.

 Regardless of if you’re one of the 81% that prefers to hand out candy or the 12% that leaves a bowl out on the porch, make sure you’re giving trick-or-treaters what they want.

 So, what do they want? We analyzed search trends to find the most popular Halloween candy in every state so you don’t have to guess. Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups swept the nation as the most popular candy in 12 states. AirHeads, Nerds, SweeTarts and Gummy Worms were the least popular, rounding out the list with just one state each.

 But Reese’s isn’t the most popular in big cities - that honor goes to M&Ms, which are the crowd favorites in New York City, San Antonio, San Diego, Fort Worth and Columbus. 

 How much is this all going to cost you? According to respondents, the average household spends just over $25 on candy while parents go above and beyond to spend $35.

 

Methodology 

 Using the Google AdWords platform, we analyzed search volume trends for more than 100 different types of candy, over the period of September 2018 to October 2018 in all 50 states and the 20 largest cities in the country.

 On September 10, 2019, we surveyed 2,004 people living in residential neighborhoods. 40 percent of respondents reported having children who still trick-or-treat, and the average age of respondents was 38 years old.

 For media inquiries, contact media@digitalthirdcoast.net

 Fair Use 

 Feel free to use this data and research with proper attribution linking to this study. When you do, please give credit and link to bid-on-equipment.com

August 2019 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of August and what are they looking for when they are here?
 

Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from BoE search traffic this month.

Bid on Equipment's Top 10 Categories Searched

Restaurant Equipment

Tanks

Machine Shop Equipment

Walk In Coolers

Dairy Equipment

Packaging Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Refrigeration Equipment

Bakery Equipment

Dust Collectors


The top ten categories sold for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Conveyors

Refrigeration Equipment

Labelers

Tanks

Bakery Equipment

Wrappers

Case Packaging Equipment

Accumulators and Unscramblers

Metal Detectors

Bagging Equipment


The top ten manufacturer pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Mueller

Multivac

Sweco

IQF

Trane

Blodgett

Vemag

Rotex

Bridgeport

Safeline


The top ten viewed Items in the last month.

CFS Unimix SSM 2500 Paddle Blender

Uhlmann Blister Machine with Cartoner

Weiler 1109 Grinder

FKI Logistic 5 Station Package Sorter

Belshaw Century Gas Donut Fryer, Multimatic Depositor and Feed Table

Kaps-All VOL-32-4 Piston Filler - Stainless Steel

Southbend Convection Steamer

Complete Vial Line

Liquid and Cream Filling Line

Kikushi Libra II Tablet Press

July 2019 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of July and what are they looking for when they are here?
 

Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from BoE search traffic this month.

Bid on Equipment's Top 10 Categories Searched

Restaurant Equipment

Dairy Equipment

Air Compressors

HVAC Equipment

Walk In Cooler

Machine Shop Equipment

Packaging Equipment

Tanks

Bakery Equipment

Refrigeration Equipment


The top ten overall categories sold for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Tanks

Wrappers

Capsule Equipment

Accumulators and Unscramblers

Case Packaging Equipment

Bagging Equipment

Labelers

Checkweighers

Meat Equipment

Conveyors


The top ten overall manufacturer pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Vemag

Multivac

IQF

Shanklin

Bridgeport

Cretors

Sweco

Conair

Handtmann

Delta


The top ten viewed Items in the last month.

Southbend DCX-2S Convection Steamer

8 Head Liquid Filler

Weiler 1109 Grinder

18 Station Krones Bottle Labeler

Kaps-All A-6 Automatic Capper with Cap Feeder

Kaps-All VOL-32-4 Piston Filler - Stainless Steel

Chester Jensen XB-4-OT-2-21 Chiller

Thomas Engineering 24-111 Coater

Goulds 3196 Centrifugal Pump - Size 3X4-10

110 Cu. Ft. Patterson Double Cone Blender

June 2019 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of June and what are they looking for when they are here?
 

Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from BoE search traffic this month.

Bid on Equipment's Top 10 Categories Searched

Restaurant Equipment

Conveyor Systems

Bakery Equipment

Dairy Equipment

Machine Shop Equipment

Freezers and Coolers

Tanks

Bagging Equipment

Air Compressors

Kettles


The top ten overall categories sold for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Conveyors

Fillers

Tanks

Shrink Equipment

Kettles

Sifters and Shakers

Accumulators and Unscramblers

Wrappers

Labelers

Capsule Equipment


The top ten overall manufacturer pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Vemag

IQF

Sweco

Bridgeport

Trane

Urschel

Multivac

Cretors

Mueller

Butcher Boy


The top ten viewed Items in the last month.

72 Valve Krones Stainless Rotary Filler with Zalkin ROPP Capper

3 Lane Nercon Multi Lane Accumulation Surge Table/Conveyor

10 HP Westfalia Decanter Centrifuge

18 Station Krones Bottle Labeler

Fitzpatrick Model SN Stainless Steel Chilsonator Compactor

10 Valve Perl Machinery 5 Gallon Water Bottle Filler

4 oz. Kalix-Dupuy Model KX60 Stainless Steel Tube Filler

72" X 11'4 Commercial Manufacturing Stainless Steel Tumbler/Rotary Washer

Eversleeve/Esleeve ESM-3200 Bottle Sleeve Labeler

1150 Sq. Ft. Reverse Pulse Jet Dust Collector, 14500 CFM

Best Cities to Open a Brewery

Beer fermenters, kegs, pumps, brewhouse equipment and a great tasting beer are only some of the ingredients in creating a successful brewery. There are plenty of other key factors brewers and brew masters need to be aware of before tapping into the beer business and opening a brewery of their own.

 

We dug deeper into those factors and analyzed data from hundreds of cities across the country to find the best cities to open a brewery. Our analysis includes everything from annual license fees and self-distribution laws to breweries per capita and median income. The list below highlights cities that provide the greatest potential for aspiring brewery owners.

Craft beer’s popularity has skyrocketed throughout the past decade, which means the opportunity is ripe to start a brewery. According to the Brewers Association, the number of craft breweries in the U.S. has grown from just under 1,500 in 2007 to more than 7,000 as of July 2018. Considering those numbers, there’s a good chance that a brewery isn’t too far from where you live, especially if you’re a Coloradoan. Our list of the top 30 cities to open a brewery features five Colorado cities, four of which have at least 6 or more breweries per 50,000 people.

 

It’s interesting to note that large metropolitan cities are scarce on our list. In fact, only five cities on our list have a population of 500,000 or more. Many small cities such as Royal Oak, Michigan; Bend, Oregon and Longmont, Colorado top our list. Speaking of Colorado and Oregon, both states make the most appearances on the top 25 list. There are six cities representing Colorado and four representing Oregon.

 

With a population of less than 100,000 people, the small but densely-populated city of Somerville, Massachusetts tops our list with an overall score of 91.2. The city has the highest percent of 21+ population on the list as well as a low state excise tax on barrels of beer along with one of the lowest brewery license fees in the country.  

 

If craft beer’s popularity continues to grow it will be interesting to see what cities hold onto their rank and what newcomers emerge. 

Methodology

 

To determine our ranking, we looked at census-defined places with at least 50,000 people in the 2017 5-Year U.S. Census’ American Community Survey. We compared these cities across two key categories, “Business Environment” and “Business Costs.” 

 

Within those categories, we measured six different metrics, which are listed below along with their corresponding weights. Each metric was graded on a 100-point scale. Data for metrics with an asterisk (*) were only available on the state level.

 

To determine an overall score, each city’s weighted average was calculated across all metrics.

 

Business Environment - 50 Points

 

  • Percent of population age 21 or over: 12.5 points
  • Number of breweries per 50,000 people: 12.5 points
  • Self-distribution* (If state allows breweries to self-distribute): 12.5 points
  • Median income: 12.5 points

 

Business Costs - 50 Points

 

  • State excise tax per barrel*: 25 points
  • Brewery license cost*: 25 points

 

Why state excise tax was included within rankings: According to the Beer Institute, a national trade association for the American brewing industry, “Taxes are the single most expensive ingredient in beer, costing more than the labor and raw materials combined.” Research has shown that approximately 40 percent of the retail price of beer is dedicated toward covering all applicable taxes. State excise tax was analyzed from the Brewers Association and based on microbreweries that are classified as selling less than 15,000 barrels per year.

 

Outliers: In order to consider oversaturation within the market, cities with more than 10 breweries per capita were calculated as outliers and therefore given a lesser grade.

 

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Brewers Association, Beer Institute, BreweryDB.com  

 

For media inquiries, contact media@digitalthirdcoast.net

 

Fair Use

 

Feel free to use this data and research with proper attribution linking to this study.

 

May 2019 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of May and what are they looking for when they are here?
 

Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from BoE search traffic this month.

Bid on Equipment's Top 10 Categories Searched

Restaurant Equipment

Dairy Equipment

Bakery Equipment

Air Compressors

Tanks

Meat Processing

Machine Shop Equipment

Bagging Machines

Conveyor Systems

Freezers and Coolers


The top ten overall categories sold for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

Candy Equipment

Labelers

Tanks

Mixers

Accumulators and Unscramblers

Shrink Equipment

Bakery Equipment

Beverage Equipment

Case Packaging Equipment

Cappers


The top ten overall manufacturer pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.

IQF

Bridgeport

Sweco

Butcher Boy

Cleaver Brooks

Quadro Comil

Handtmann

Hayssen

Trane

Mueller


The top ten viewed Items in the last month.

Carruthers Advantage Slicer / Dicer

4 Quill Kaps All Inline Bottle Capper - Explosion Proof

Hartness 825 Case-Tray Bottle Packer

Tanazzi Colibri 601 Plastic Tube Filler and Sealer

6 Quill Surekap Inline Bottle Capper with Cap Feed Elevator Sorter

Anhydro BFB30 Fluid Bed Dryer

10 Gallon Sanitary Reactor Vessel with Mixer

11" Dia. X 12'6" L Sanitary Construction Screw Conveyor

Chester Jensen XB-4-OT-2-21 Chiller

Kaps All VOL-32-4 Piston Filler - Stainless Steel